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Hit Parade

By | December 1, 2012

Cell-based assays are popular for high-throughput screens, where they strike a balance between ease of use and similarity to the human body that researchers aim to treat.

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Microchannel Masterpiece

By | December 1, 2012

A precision microfluidic system enables single-cell analysis of growth and division.

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Playing the Field

By | December 1, 2012

The role of field biologists is changing as conservation biology evolves and ecological challenges mount.

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Art Through the Nose

By | November 29, 2012

A new show at New York’s Museum of Art and Design celebrates olfaction and the science behind modern perfume making.

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Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

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Sandy’s Impact on Science

By | November 5, 2012

More stories surface about how last week’s super storm is affecting research up and down the coast—and how science is fighting back.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

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Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

1 Comment

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Creative Emulsification

By | November 1, 2012

Enhancing data collection from emulsion PCR reactions: three case studies

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image: Military Mind Wars

Military Mind Wars

By | November 1, 2012

How neuroscience research can inform military counterintelligence tactics, and the moral responsibilities that accompany such research

5 Comments

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