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image: Molecular Multitasker

Molecular Multitasker

By | April 1, 2014

Scientists create a way to isolate mRNA from a single living cell within a tissue.

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image: New Blood, circa 1914

New Blood, circa 1914

By | April 1, 2014

World War I provided testing grounds for novel blood-transfusion techniques.

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image: Stem Cell Alter Egos

Stem Cell Alter Egos

By | April 1, 2014

Researchers show that cancer stem cells can exist in two distinct and interconvertible states.

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image: Cysteine Aids Mice with Huntington’s

Cysteine Aids Mice with Huntington’s

By | March 31, 2014

Rodent models of Huntington’s disease show dysfunctional cysteine production, and adding the amino acid to their diets seems to relieve symptoms.  

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image: STAP Confusion Abounds

STAP Confusion Abounds

By | March 31, 2014

Stem cells supposedly derived by the new method of stimulus-induced acquisition of pluripotency may have come from mouse strains other than those claimed.

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image: Goat Pheromone Double Whammy

Goat Pheromone Double Whammy

By | March 3, 2014

A single molecule emitted by male goats may influence female goat physiology and behavior.

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image: A CRISPR Fore-Cas-t

A CRISPR Fore-Cas-t

By | March 1, 2014

A newcomer’s guide to the hottest gene-editing tool on the block

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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.

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image: Tension Tracker

Tension Tracker

By | March 1, 2014

For the first time, researchers quantify the mechanical forces cells exert on one another.

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