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image: Telomeres Affect Gene Expression

Telomeres Affect Gene Expression

By | May 5, 2013

As telomeres shorten with age, genes as far as 1,000 kilobases away could be affected, including one responsible for an inherited muscle disease.

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image: Re-sensitizing Resistant Bacteria

Re-sensitizing Resistant Bacteria

By | May 2, 2013

Researchers use a protein-lipid complex found in human breast milk to increase the activity of otherwise-ineffective antibiotics against drug-resistant pathogens.

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image: Easy Jump for H5N1 from Bird to Mammal

Easy Jump for H5N1 from Bird to Mammal

By | May 2, 2013

Hybrid viruses derived from an H5N1 bird flu strain can infect guinea pigs through the air.

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image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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image: Down for the Count

Down for the Count

By | May 1, 2013

One, two, three, four . . . . Counting colonies and plaques can be tedious, but tools exist to streamline the process.

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image: Sharing the Load

Sharing the Load

By | May 1, 2013

By varying the size of their steps, dynein motor proteins work effectively as teams to carry heavy loads around the cell.

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image: Suited to a T

Suited to a T

By | May 1, 2013

Sorting out T-cell functional and phenotypic heterogeneity depends on studying single cells.

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image: Sensing Calories Without Taste

Sensing Calories Without Taste

By | April 22, 2013

Rodents and fruit flies appear to be able to sense nutrients even when they can’t taste the food they’re eating. Now, researchers are trying to figure out how.

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image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Atomic Force Microscopy

Atomic Force Microscopy

By | April 2, 2013

The new technique reveals unprecedented details of microscopic life.

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