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image: Retina Recordings

Retina Recordings

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists adapt an in vivo retina recorder for ex vivo use.

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Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

By | September 25, 2014

Using citation statistics, the firm forecasts which researchers are likely to take home science’s top honors this year.

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image: Heritable Histones

Heritable Histones

By | September 18, 2014

Scientists show how roundworm daughter cells remember the histone modification patterns of their parents.

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image: Giant DNA Origami

Giant DNA Origami

By | September 18, 2014

Researchers create the largest 3-D DNA structures to date, many times bigger than previously constructed origami shapes.

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Crossing Boundaries

By | September 1, 2014

A groundbreaker in the study of Listeria monocytogenes, Pascale Cossart continues to build her research tool kit to understand how to fight such intracellular human pathogens.

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Entry Requirements

By | September 1, 2014

Recent developments in cell transfection and molecular delivery technologies

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Rewritten in Blood

Rewritten in Blood

By | September 1, 2014

A modified gene-editing technique corrects mutations in human hematopoietic stem cells.

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