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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | August 1, 2016

Brexit's effect on science, melding disciplines, and more

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image: Riboswitch Screen

Riboswitch Screen

By | August 1, 2016

A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.

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image: Software for Image Analysis

Software for Image Analysis

By | August 1, 2016

Profiles of five programs for quantifying data from Westerns, dot blots, gels, and colony cultures

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image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

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image: A New Way to ID Targets of RNA-Binding Proteins

A New Way to ID Targets of RNA-Binding Proteins

By | July 1, 2016

The catalytic domain of an RNA-editing enzyme is fused with RNA-binding proteins.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Blood Sugar</em>

Book Excerpt from Blood Sugar

By | July 1, 2016

Author Anthony Ryan Hatch relays his personal experience with metabolic syndrome.

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image: Composite Endpoints in Clinical Trials

Composite Endpoints in Clinical Trials

By | July 1, 2016

There’s a right way and a wrong way to boost the statistical sensitivity of this type of clinical studies.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

Metabolic Syndrome, Research, and Race

By | July 1, 2016

Scientists who study the lifestyle disorder must do a better job of incorporating political and social science into their work.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

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