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image: Tailoring Your Proteome View

Tailoring Your Proteome View

By | August 1, 2014

Computational tools can streamline the development of targeted proteomics experiments.  

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image: Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

Bird’s-Eye Proteomics

By | July 1, 2014

A guide to mass spectrometers that can handle the top-down-proteomics challenge

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image: The Sooner, The Better

The Sooner, The Better

By | July 1, 2014

New approaches to diagnosing bacterial infections may one day allow the identification of pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in a matter of hours or minutes.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

By | June 9, 2014

An advisory committee for the BRAIN Initiative says that to fully fund the goals of the neuroscience research program, taxpayers should fork over $4.5 billion.

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Moving Target

Moving Target

By | June 1, 2014

New mass spectrometry–based techniques are blurring the lines between discovery and targeted proteomics.

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image: Singularly Alluring

Singularly Alluring

By | June 1, 2014

Microfluidic tools and techniques for investigating cells, one by one

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image: Accelerating Antibody Discovery

Accelerating Antibody Discovery

By | May 1, 2014

Techniques for faster discovery and isolation of human monoclonal antibodies

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image: Fuel Gauge

Fuel Gauge

By | May 1, 2014

An optical reporter quantitatively measures the ATP demands of presynaptic neurons.

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