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image: Organoid Biobank

Organoid Biobank

By | May 11, 2015

From the tissue of numerous colon cancer patients, researchers build 3-D cultures of tumors.

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image: All Is Not Quiet on the Western Front

All Is Not Quiet on the Western Front

By | May 1, 2015

A grab bag of advances is making Western blots faster, more sensitive, and more reliable.

3 Comments

image: Show Me Your Moves

Show Me Your Moves

By | May 1, 2015

Updated classics and new techniques help microbiologists get up close and quantitative.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

By | April 6, 2015

Researchers apply the genome-editing technology to alter histones at distant gene enhancers, controlling gene expression.

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image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.

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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Getting Your Sugar Fix

Getting Your Sugar Fix

By | April 1, 2015

A guide to glycan microarrays

1 Comment

image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

1 Comment

image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

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