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image: Atomic Force Microscopy

Atomic Force Microscopy

By | April 2, 2013

The new technique reveals unprecedented details of microscopic life.

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Mimicking Mussels

Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Structure by Feel

Structure by Feel

By | April 1, 2013

Applying the sensitive touch of atomic force microscopy to DNA, cells, and proteins

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: DIY in the Lab

DIY in the Lab

By | March 1, 2013

Things break in the lab. Here’s how to protect your equipment, and what to do when it stops working.

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image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

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