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» techniques and developmental biology

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image: Deep Tissue Treatment

Deep Tissue Treatment

By | September 1, 2011

A new, genetically encoded tag for electron microscopy may revolutionize studies of specific proteins in cells and tissues.

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image: Velcro Helps Muscles Grow

Velcro Helps Muscles Grow

By | August 31, 2011

Stretching muscle cells as they grow helps promote the expression of growth factors.

9 Comments

image: Next Generation: Electronic Skin

Next Generation: Electronic Skin

By | August 17, 2011

Tiny, flexible electronic chips embedded in a skin-like material monitor vitals and stimulate muscles.

3 Comments

image: The Father of Trial Randomization Dies

The Father of Trial Randomization Dies

By | August 15, 2011

Statistician Paul Meier, who championed the random assignment of patients to treatment groups in clinical trials, changed the way the researchers test experimental drugs.

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image: Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once

Next Generation: Hundreds of Cell-Analyses at Once

By | August 11, 2011

A new microfluidics chip lets researchers analyze the nucleic acids of 300 individual cells simultaneously.

3 Comments

image: Lab-Grown Sperm

Lab-Grown Sperm

By | August 4, 2011

Healthy mice are born from germ cell precursors grown in vitro.

6 Comments

image: Top 7 in Immunology

Top 7 in Immunology

By | August 2, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in microbiology and related areas, from Faculty of 1000

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image: Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

Deconstructing the Mosaic Brain

By | August 1, 2011

Sequencing the DNA of individual neurons is a way to dissect the genes underlying major neurological and psychological disorders.

6 Comments

image: The Right Sort

The Right Sort

By | August 1, 2011

Using the strongest molecular binding partnership in biology to separate different cell types.

6 Comments

image: The Right Sort

The Right Sort

By | August 1, 2011

Isolating specific cell types from a mass of plant or animal tissue is laborious and tricky. 

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