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» techniques and developmental biology

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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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image: Tension Tracker

Tension Tracker

By | March 1, 2014

For the first time, researchers quantify the mechanical forces cells exert on one another.

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image: More Monkeys With Edited Genomes

More Monkeys With Edited Genomes

By | February 14, 2014

Researchers use the TALEN genome-editing technique to generate a primate model of Rett syndrome.  

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image: Graphene Coating Cleans Up Clots

Graphene Coating Cleans Up Clots

By | February 12, 2014

Blood clots on medical devices might be reduced by a graphene-based material.  

1 Comment

image: Molecular Motors

Molecular Motors

By | February 12, 2014

Researchers control nanomotors inside living cells.

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image: The Year of Crystallography

The Year of Crystallography

By | February 11, 2014

UNESCO highlights accomplishments in crystallography in a year-long celebration in 2014.  

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image: Neural Target for Autism?

Neural Target for Autism?

By | February 7, 2014

Mouse and rat models of the developmental disorder responded positively to a drug given to their mothers a day before birth.

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image: First CRISPR-Tinkered Primates Born

First CRISPR-Tinkered Primates Born

By | February 3, 2014

Twin macaques are the first primates born whose genomes were edited using CRISPR technology.

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image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

image: Tag, You're It

Tag, You're It

By | February 1, 2014

A guide to DNA-encoded libraries for drug discovery

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