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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

1 Comment

image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

1 Comment

image: How to Make a New Species

How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

3 Comments

image: Tools for Drools

Tools for Drools

By | July 1, 2015

A general guide to collecting and processing saliva

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image: Neanderthal-Human Hybrid Unearthed

Neanderthal-Human Hybrid Unearthed

By | June 22, 2015

DNA from the 40,000-year-old bones of a modern human found in Europe contains Neanderthal genes.

4 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: An Array of Options

An Array of Options

By | June 1, 2015

A guide for how and when to transition from the microarray to RNA-seq

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image: Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

Flow Cytometry On-a-Chip

By | June 1, 2015

Novel microfluidic devices give researchers new ways to count and sort single cells.

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image: RNA Stucturomics

RNA Stucturomics

By | June 1, 2015

A new high-throughput, transcriptome-wide assay determines RNA structures in vivo.

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