Advertisement
Amazon
Amazon

The Scientist

» techniques, disease/medicine and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Brighter, Smaller, Faster

Brighter, Smaller, Faster

By | February 1, 2013

As X-ray crystallography enters its second century, shrinking crystals and brighter light sources are redefining structural biology.

0 Comments

image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

2 Comments

image: Flickering Neurons

Flickering Neurons

By | February 1, 2013

Fluorescent calcium sensors in transgenic mice give a real-time readout of neuronal activity.

1 Comment

image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

2 Comments

image: Next Generation: Nano-Imaging

Next Generation: Nano-Imaging

By | January 31, 2013

Researchers take advantage of a diamond’s atomic flaw to devise a sensor that may one day snap images of individual molecules.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

By | January 28, 2013

From cardiovascular problems to neurological disorders, a plethora of new medical devices are reducing the need for surgery and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells Not Rejected

Stem Cells Not Rejected

By | January 25, 2013

Researchers uncover more evidence that reprogrammed stem cells are not attacked by the immune system, suggesting they may one day serve as effective therapies.

1 Comment

image: Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

By | January 24, 2013

The majority of human melanomas contain mutations in a gene promoter, suggesting mutations in regulatory regions may spur some cancers.

3 Comments

image: Bird Flu Research to Resume

Bird Flu Research to Resume

By | January 24, 2013

After a year-long voluntary moratorium to discuss regulations and safety measures, scientists are set to resume controversial H5N1 research.

1 Comment

Advertisement
EMD Millipore
EMD Millipore

Popular Now

  1. Neanderthals’ Genetic Legacy
  2. Turning Tumor Cells Against Cancer
  3. Brazil’s Pre-Zika Microcephaly Cases
    The Nutshell Brazil’s Pre-Zika Microcephaly Cases

    A review of four years’ worth of medical records finds far greater numbers of microcephaly cases from before the ongoing Zika virus epidemic than had been officially reported.

  4. The Mycobiome
    Features The Mycobiome

    The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Life Technologies