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Clostridium botulinum produces a transcription factor that can aggregate and self-propagate a prion-like form, leading to genome-wide changes in gene expression in E. coli, according to a study.

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A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.

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image: Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

Exploring the Epigenetics of Ethnicity

By | January 11, 2017

Researchers attempt to estimate how much of the human genome’s methylation patterns can be attributed to genetic ancestry.

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image: Characterizing the Imprintome

Characterizing the Imprintome

By | January 1, 2017

Three techniques for identifying the collection of maternal and paternal genes silenced in offspring

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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A test tube-based genome-labeling technique has been brought under the microscope.

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image: Pharma Redo

Pharma Redo

By | January 1, 2017

Steve Braun of Cures Within Reach, a nonprofit focused on breathing new life into old medicines, describes the potential benefits of drug repurposing.

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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image: Top Technical Advances 2016

Top Technical Advances 2016

By | December 15, 2016

The year’s most impressive achievements include methods to watch translation in cells, trace cell fates, avoid mitochondrial mutations, edit DNA, and build antibiotics from scratch.

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image: Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

By | December 11, 2016

This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.

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