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Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

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Live-Action Networks

By | October 1, 2012

Mass spec plus novel software equals dynamic views into the chemical lives of microbes.

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2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

By | October 1, 2012

Check out other memorable images and videos that were submitted to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.

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Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

21 Comments

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Medicines for the World

By | October 1, 2012

A global R&D treaty could boost innovation and improve the health of the world’s poor—and rich.

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The Sharper Image

By | October 1, 2012

Advances in light microscopy allow the mapping of cell migration during embryogenesis and capture dynamic processes at the cellular level.

1 Comment

image: Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

Cystic Fibrosis Alters Microbiome?

By | September 28, 2012

The microbiome of the lung is different in patients with the disease, which causes a thick buildup of mucus that makes breathing difficult.

2 Comments

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Researchers Discover New Element

By | September 28, 2012

Japanese scientists have created a superheavy atom, potentially expanding the periodic table.

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Evolving Dependence

By | September 27, 2012

Scientists unravel the confusing molecular biology behind a fruit fly’s reliance on a single type of cactus.

1 Comment

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Next Generation: Nanowire Forest

By | September 26, 2012

Researchers show that nanowire-based biosensors can collect and detect proteins in one chip.

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