The Scientist

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image: A Room with a View

A Room with a View

By | February 1, 2013

Live-cell imaging forces cells to perform in an unnatural environment, but with the right chamber, you can keep them warm and comfortable.

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image: Brighter, Smaller, Faster

Brighter, Smaller, Faster

By | February 1, 2013

As X-ray crystallography enters its second century, shrinking crystals and brighter light sources are redefining structural biology.

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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

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image: Flickering Neurons

Flickering Neurons

By | February 1, 2013

Fluorescent calcium sensors in transgenic mice give a real-time readout of neuronal activity.

1 Comment

image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

2 Comments

image: Next Generation: Nano-Imaging

Next Generation: Nano-Imaging

By | January 31, 2013

Researchers take advantage of a diamond’s atomic flaw to devise a sensor that may one day snap images of individual molecules.

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image: Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

By | January 28, 2013

From cardiovascular problems to neurological disorders, a plethora of new medical devices are reducing the need for surgery and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.

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image: Stem Cells Not Rejected

Stem Cells Not Rejected

By | January 25, 2013

Researchers uncover more evidence that reprogrammed stem cells are not attacked by the immune system, suggesting they may one day serve as effective therapies.

1 Comment

image: Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

By | January 24, 2013

The majority of human melanomas contain mutations in a gene promoter, suggesting mutations in regulatory regions may spur some cancers.

3 Comments

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