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» techniques, ecology and immunology

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image: Next Generation: A Molecular Camera

Next Generation: A Molecular Camera

By | March 14, 2012

Knocking electrons out of atomic orbit with a laser allows researchers to take femtosecond-scale “movies” of molecules in motion.

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image: Electric Molluscs

Electric Molluscs

By | March 14, 2012

Snails with implanted electrodes generate electricity via metabolism.

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image: Ozone Defender Dies

Ozone Defender Dies

By | March 13, 2012

Nobel Laureate Sherwood Rowland, who first demonstrated that the ozone layer could be destroyed by chemical pollutants, passes away at age 84.

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image: Transplant Without Drugs?

Transplant Without Drugs?

By | March 8, 2012

A new method for transplanting immunologically mismatched organs may remove the need for life-long immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection.

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image: The Sweet Sounds of Spider Silk

The Sweet Sounds of Spider Silk

By | March 7, 2012

A researcher spins spider silk into violin strings.

4 Comments

image: Antarctic Invasion

Antarctic Invasion

By | March 5, 2012

Invasive species threaten the most pristine place on Earth.

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Contributors

March 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Delivering Silence

Delivering Silence

By | March 1, 2012

Using RNA viruses to silence genes could optimize tissue targeting while reducing toxicity.

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image: How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

By | March 1, 2012

A lot changes in a child’s body over the course of development, and not all changes occur linearly: gene expression can fluctuate, and organs can perform different functions on the way to their final purpose in the body. Here are some of the key deve

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image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

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