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Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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image: Monkey See, Monkey Die

Monkey See, Monkey Die

By | May 1, 2016

What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?

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image: Scaling to Singles

Scaling to Singles

By | May 1, 2016

Tips for tracing transcription in individual cells

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image: Sense and Sensibility

Sense and Sensibility

By | May 1, 2016

Tailored combinations of a reporter and a ligand-binding domain allow for sensing just about any molecule of interest.

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Sensors for All

By | May 1, 2016

A versatile modular strategy for detecting small molecules in eukaryotes

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Silent Canopies

By | May 1, 2016

A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.

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image: Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

Study: Small Fish Comforted By Big Predators

By | April 28, 2016

Baby fish show fewer signs of stress in the presence of large fish that scare off midsize predators. 

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

AACR Q&A: Elaine Mardis

By | April 18, 2016

The genomics pioneer shares the sessions she most looks forward to at this year’s American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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