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image: Winged Dino Found?

Winged Dino Found?

By | May 1, 2015

Researchers describe a small species that may have soared through Jurassic skies on membranous wings like those of bats and flying squirrels.

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image: All Is Not Quiet on the Western Front

All Is Not Quiet on the Western Front

By | May 1, 2015

A grab bag of advances is making Western blots faster, more sensitive, and more reliable.

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image: Show Me Your Moves

Show Me Your Moves

By | May 1, 2015

Updated classics and new techniques help microbiologists get up close and quantitative.

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image: Similar Strokes

Similar Strokes

By | April 29, 2015

Physics drove the convergent evolution of swimming in 22 unrelated marine species, a study suggests.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Citrus History

Citrus History

By | April 16, 2015

An analysis of 34 chloroplast genomes reveals how and when modern fruit varieties evolved from a common ancestor.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | April 8, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

By | April 6, 2015

Researchers apply the genome-editing technology to alter histones at distant gene enhancers, controlling gene expression.

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image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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