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A chloroplast mutation has dramatically affected the genomes of railside populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

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image: Riboswitch Screen

Riboswitch Screen

By | August 1, 2016

A newly developed method detects regulators of bacterial transcription called riboswitches.

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image: Software for Image Analysis

Software for Image Analysis

By | August 1, 2016

Profiles of five programs for quantifying data from Westerns, dot blots, gels, and colony cultures

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image: Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Fast-evolving regions of the human genome differentiate our species from all other mammals.

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image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

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image: Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Do the portions of our genomes that set us apart from other animals hold the secret to human evolution?

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image: Humans Never Stopped Evolving

Humans Never Stopped Evolving

By | August 1, 2016

The emergence of blood abnormalities, an adult ability to digest milk, and changes in our physical appearance point to the continued evolution of the human race.

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image: Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

Wolf Species Are Part Coyote

By | July 28, 2016

Genomic analysis reveals wolves and coyotes have hybridized, potentially complicating wolves' protection under the US Endangered Species Act.

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image: Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

By | July 25, 2016

The partnering of an alga and a fungus to make lichen may be only two-thirds of the equation.

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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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