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image: New Blood, circa 1914

New Blood, circa 1914

By | April 1, 2014

World War I provided testing grounds for novel blood-transfusion techniques.

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image: Python Auto-Pilot

Python Auto-Pilot

By | March 20, 2014

Invasive snakes in Florida show evidence of a compass sense they use to navigate back to home territory.

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image: Old-School Fish Guides

Old-School Fish Guides

By | March 18, 2014

Experienced fish may be critical for keeping migrating populations on track, a study finds.

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image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

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image: A CRISPR Fore-Cas-t

A CRISPR Fore-Cas-t

By | March 1, 2014

A newcomer’s guide to the hottest gene-editing tool on the block

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image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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image: Tension Tracker

Tension Tracker

By | March 1, 2014

For the first time, researchers quantify the mechanical forces cells exert on one another.

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image: More Monkeys With Edited Genomes

More Monkeys With Edited Genomes

By | February 14, 2014

Researchers use the TALEN genome-editing technique to generate a primate model of Rett syndrome.  

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image: Graphene Coating Cleans Up Clots

Graphene Coating Cleans Up Clots

By | February 12, 2014

Blood clots on medical devices might be reduced by a graphene-based material.  

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image: Molecular Motors

Molecular Motors

By | February 12, 2014

Researchers control nanomotors inside living cells.

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