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image: CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

CRISPR–Enabled Epigenome Editing

By | April 6, 2015

Researchers apply the genome-editing technology to alter histones at distant gene enhancers, controlling gene expression.

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image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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image: Getting Your Sugar Fix

Getting Your Sugar Fix

By | April 1, 2015

A guide to glycan microarrays

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image: In Custody

In Custody

By | April 1, 2015

Expert tips for isolating and culturing cancer stem cells

1 Comment

image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

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image: Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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image: Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

By | March 25, 2015

The earthiness of Merlot may have to do with grapevine-dwelling microbiota.

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image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

1 Comment

image: Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

By | March 12, 2015

Researchers develop a technique to trigger neural activity in culture using light to heat gold nanoparticles.

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