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image: New Test for Zika OKed

New Test for Zika OKed

By | March 22, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration gave emergency approval for a combination diagnostic that can distinguish between Zika, dengue, and chikungunya infections.

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image: Origins of Dysentery

Origins of Dysentery

By | March 22, 2016

A new genomic analysis reveals that the pathogen responsible for the gastrointestinal disease likely originated in Europe and hitched a ride to new lands with settlers.

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image: CRISPR Can Tag RNA

CRISPR Can Tag RNA

By | March 21, 2016

Modifications to the DNA-slicing program allow for monitoring the movement of messenger RNA.

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image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Microbial Recycler Found

Microbial Recycler Found

By | March 14, 2016

Researchers discover a new species of bacteria that can break down a commonly used plastic.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: How to Use P-Values Correctly

How to Use P-Values Correctly

By | March 9, 2016

The American Statistical Association offers guidance on best practices for the oft-misused tool.

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image: Reproducibility Crisis Not So Bad?

Reproducibility Crisis Not So Bad?

By | March 7, 2016

Two studies temper the dismal assessment of psychology and economics researchers’ abilities to replicate one another’s experiments.

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image: Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

Opinion: A Mother’s Microbes

By | March 3, 2016

On “vaginal seeding” and the challenge of evidence-based parenting

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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