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image: Another Alzheimer’s Blood Test?

Another Alzheimer’s Blood Test?

By | July 9, 2014

Researchers identify a set of proteins that can predict the development of Alzheimer’s disease-related dementia with 87 percent accuracy.

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image: New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

New Catalog of Human Gut Microbes

By | July 9, 2014

An updated analysis of the gut microbiome extends the list of known bacterial genes to 9.8 million. 

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image: Human Gene Set Shrinks Again

Human Gene Set Shrinks Again

By | July 8, 2014

Proteomic data suggest the human genome may encode fewer than 20,000 genes.

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image: Mutations Pervade Mitochondrial DNA

Mutations Pervade Mitochondrial DNA

By | July 7, 2014

Pathogenic mutations in mitochondrial DNA are common in healthy people, according to a new study.

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image: Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

Protein Helps Cells Adapt—or Die

By | July 3, 2014

Scientists show how cell stress both prevents and promotes cell suicide in a study that’s equally divisive.

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image: Magic Mushroom Dreams

Magic Mushroom Dreams

By | July 3, 2014

A psychedelic compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms triggers brain activity characteristic of dream states.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: Lichen Legion

Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

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image: The Rise of Color

The Rise of Color

By | July 1, 2014

An analysis of modern birds reveals that carotenoid-based plumage coloring arose several times throughout their evolutionary history, dating as far back as 66 million years ago.

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image: Accidental Orgasms

Accidental Orgasms

By | July 1, 2014

Meet the researcher struggling to gain approval for his medical device, which was originally designed to relieve back pain, but turned out to be an orgasm inducer.

1 Comment

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