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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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The plant Lophophytum pilfers mitochondrial genes from the species it parasitizes.

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image: Infographic: Modeling Molecules’ Receptor Binding

Infographic: Modeling Molecules’ Receptor Binding

By | February 1, 2017

A software upgrade follows ligands step-wise into their binding sites on receptors.

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image: Restoring a Native Island Habitat

Restoring a Native Island Habitat

By | January 30, 2017

Removal of non-native vegetation from an island ecosystem revives pollinator activity and, in turn, native plant growth. 

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image: ACMG Urges Caution When Editing Embryo Genomes

ACMG Urges Caution When Editing Embryo Genomes

By | January 30, 2017

The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics calls on scientists and health care providers to engage in public discussion about the ethical issues involved in genome editing. 

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image: Improving Tomato Flavor, Genetically

Improving Tomato Flavor, Genetically

By | January 26, 2017

A sequencing blitz on the tomato genome reveals the genes that contribute most to tastiness.

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image: Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

Improved Semisynthetic Organism Created

By | January 23, 2017

Researchers generate an organism that can replicate artificial base pairs indefinitely.

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Using simulations, scientists report that a mixture of termites and plant competition may be responsible for the strange patterns of earth surrounded by plants in the Namib desert. 

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image: Image of the Day: Goodbye Colo

Image of the Day: Goodbye Colo

By | January 18, 2017

Colo, the oldest zoo gorilla and the first born in captivity, died on January 17 at age 60.

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A cell phone–based microscope can identify mutations in tumor tissue and image products of DNA sequencing reactions.

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