The Scientist

» techniques

Most Recent

image: Structure by Feel

Structure by Feel

By | April 1, 2013

Applying the sensitive touch of atomic force microscopy to DNA, cells, and proteins

1 Comment

image: DIY in the Lab

DIY in the Lab

By | March 1, 2013

Things break in the lab. Here’s how to protect your equipment, and what to do when it stops working.

2 Comments

image: Set It and Forget It

Set It and Forget It

By | March 1, 2013

A tour of three systems for automating cell culture

0 Comments

image: Sticky Lithography

Sticky Lithography

By | March 1, 2013

Scotch tape and a scalpel provide a MacGyver-esque approach to microfabrication.

1 Comment

image: Next Generation: Dynamic, Nanoscale GFP

Next Generation: Dynamic, Nanoscale GFP

By | February 12, 2013

A new faster-switching, longer-lasting GFP allows gentler and faster high resolution microscopy on living cells.

0 Comments

image: A Room with a View

A Room with a View

By | February 1, 2013

Live-cell imaging forces cells to perform in an unnatural environment, but with the right chamber, you can keep them warm and comfortable.

2 Comments

image: Brighter, Smaller, Faster

Brighter, Smaller, Faster

By | February 1, 2013

As X-ray crystallography enters its second century, shrinking crystals and brighter light sources are redefining structural biology.

0 Comments

image: Flickering Neurons

Flickering Neurons

By | February 1, 2013

Fluorescent calcium sensors in transgenic mice give a real-time readout of neuronal activity.

1 Comment

image: Next Generation: Nano-Imaging

Next Generation: Nano-Imaging

By | January 31, 2013

Researchers take advantage of a diamond’s atomic flaw to devise a sensor that may one day snap images of individual molecules.

0 Comments

image: Fast Worms

Fast Worms

By | January 1, 2013

A microfluidic device scans individual C. elegans for abnormal traits and sorts wild-type animals from mutants.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  2. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs
RayBiotech