The Scientist

» epidemiology and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

Three Monkey Brains, One Robotic Arm

By | July 10, 2015

Researchers network the brains of three monkeys to create a “living computer” that can steer an image of a robotic arm toward a target.

0 Comments

image: Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

Gene Therapy Fixes Mouse Hearing

By | July 9, 2015

Expressing a gene for a component of the inner ear’s hair cells treated a form of genetic deafness.

0 Comments

An international panel concludes that the World Health Organization is not prepared to handle another emergency like the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

0 Comments

image: Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

Can We Smell A Trillion Odors?

By | July 8, 2015

A reanalysis calls into question a year-old claim that humans can decipher at least 1 trillion different scents.

2 Comments

image: Ebola Risk in Liberia?

Ebola Risk in Liberia?

By | July 7, 2015

Authorities report three cases of Ebola in Liberia, which was declared free of the virus in May.

0 Comments

image: The Death Toll Tied to Sweet Drinks

The Death Toll Tied to Sweet Drinks

By | July 1, 2015

Annually, about 184,000 deaths annually are linked to drinking sugary beverages, according to a new study.

7 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

0 Comments

image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

0 Comments

image: The Lies That Scars Tell

The Lies That Scars Tell

By | July 1, 2015

Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

1 Comment

image: Driven to Extinction

Driven to Extinction

By | July 1, 2015

The eradication of smallpox set the standard for the global elimination of a devastating infectious disease. Will the ongoing polio and guinea worm campaigns be as successful?

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal
    News & Opinion Opinion: Why I Published in a Predatory Journal

    My “colleagues” and I at the fictitious Arthur Vandelay Urological Research Institute were surprised to find our bogus “uromycitisis” case report swiftly accepted, with only minor revisions requested.

  2. Consilience, Episode 3: Cancer, Obscured
  3. March for Science: Dispatches from Washington, DC
  4. Human Cord Plasma Protein Boosts Cognitive Function in Older Mice
AAAS