The Scientist

» epidemiology and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: MERS-CoV Hits Austria

MERS-CoV Hits Austria

By | October 2, 2014

The WHO reports the first case of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in Austria while more cases are confirmed in Saudi Arabia.

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Chagas Watchdogs

Chagas Watchdogs

By | September 1, 2014

Can screening dogs for Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies inform public health officials about the risk of Chagas disease to people?

0 Comments

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Social Data for Ebola Surveillance

Social Data for Ebola Surveillance

By | August 26, 2014

Algorithms that map social media posts and mobile phone data can help researchers track epidemics.

0 Comments

image: DARPA Challenge to Predict Chikungunya Spread

DARPA Challenge to Predict Chikungunya Spread

By | August 19, 2014

Contest aims to identify models that accurately forecast outbreaks.

0 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Tracing a Virus’s Past to Predict its Future

Tracing a Virus’s Past to Predict its Future

By | June 26, 2014

As chikungunya spreads across the Caribbean, researchers work to determine the virus’s next steps and understand its evolving partnership with mosquitoes.

0 Comments

image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

0 Comments

image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Optimism for Key Deer After Hurricane Irma
  2. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
  3. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  4. Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes
    The Nutshell Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes

    Analysis of the bodies of deceased individuals can’t determine what effect these tattoo remnants have on lymph function, but researchers suggest dirty needles aren’t the only risk of the age-old practice.

AAAS