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image: <em>E. coli</em> epidemic baffles doctors

E. coli epidemic baffles doctors

By | June 3, 2011

A highly virulent strain of E. coli that has already killed two people and infected around 800 (most of whom live or had visited northern Germany) has proved an enigma for epidemiologists. 

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image: Mapping HIV in the US

Mapping HIV in the US

By | June 3, 2011

A detailed interactive map shows the distribution of people in the United States who are infected with HIV, Wired reports.

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image: Cell phones cause cancer?

Cell phones cause cancer?

By | June 3, 2011

A study commissioned by the World Health Organization suggests that electromagnetic fields given off by cell phones may cause brain cancer. 

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image: Pick your frog poison

Pick your frog poison

By | May 31, 2011

Human development may destroy natural habitats, but it could also provide amphibians with a safe haven from deadly fungal infections.

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image: Google, epidemiology tool

Google, epidemiology tool

By | May 26, 2011

Researchers have found a nifty new use for Google -- the popular search tool may be able to track the spread of the deadly bacterial disease, MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). 

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image: Control from Without

Control from Without

By | May 25, 2011

Editor's Choice in Developmental Biology

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image: Primal Fashion

Primal Fashion

By | May 20, 2011

Two sisters -- a developmental biologist and high-end fashion designer -- team up to develop a couture collection inspired by the first 1,000 hours of embryonic life.

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Skeleton Keys

By | May 14, 2011

There are a surprising number of unknowns about how our limbs come to be symmetrical.

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image: Taking Shape

Taking Shape

By | April 1, 2011

Floral bouquets are the most ephemeral of presents. The puzzle of how flowers get their shape, however, is more enduring. 

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image: The Footprints of Winter

The Footprints of Winter

By | March 1, 2011

Epigenetic marks laid down during the cold months of the year allow flowering in spring and summer.

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