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image: Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

By | November 26, 2013

The state assembles a task force to try to slow the growth of burgeoning populations of the ecologically destructive invasive species.

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image: H6N1 Can Affect Humans

H6N1 Can Affect Humans

By | November 14, 2013

Taiwanese scientists confirm the first person to have been infected by the H6N1 strain of avian flu.

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image: Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

By | October 29, 2013

New evidence indicates that invasive Asian carp have bred in the Lake Erie basin.

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image: EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

By | October 25, 2013

The European Parliament rejected a proposal designed to fund the construction of new fishing boats, instead opting to fund a project that aims to curtail overfishing.

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image: Trouble in the Heartland

Trouble in the Heartland

By | October 1, 2013

A new tick-borne disease has emerged in the US Midwest—and the culprit is not a bacterium. 

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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

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image: The Many Mysteries of MERS

The Many Mysteries of MERS

By | September 8, 2013

As researchers test a treatment for Middle East respiratory syndrome, the deadly coronavirus that causes it slowly reveals itself.

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image: Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

By | September 1, 2013

Researchers characterize drug-resistant tuberculosis by analyzing the genomes of more than 500 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from around the world.

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image: Killer Cups?

Killer Cups?

By | August 16, 2013

Heavy coffee drinkers under 55 are more likely to die sooner, a study shows.

8 Comments

image: Bird Flu Spreads Between People

Bird Flu Spreads Between People

By | August 7, 2013

The H7N9 avian flu strain appears to have been transmitted from human to human for the first time, but its ability to jump between people is limited.

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