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image: New Test for Zika OKed

New Test for Zika OKed

By | March 22, 2016

The US Food and Drug Administration gave emergency approval for a combination diagnostic that can distinguish between Zika, dengue, and chikungunya infections.

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image: Predicting Zika’s Potential Path

Predicting Zika’s Potential Path

By | March 17, 2016

The mosquitoes that carry the virus could spread to US cities this summer, with travelers returning from Zika-infected regions contributing to the disease’s spread.

1 Comment

image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | March 14, 2016

Virus found in breastmilk; another disease linked to Zika infection; some mosquitoes resistant to pesticide; genetically engineered–mosquito field trials could proceed

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

3 Comments

image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

2 Comments

image: Can Talc Cause Cancer?

Can Talc Cause Cancer?

By | March 2, 2016

A jury recently awarded $72 million in a talcum-powder–ovarian cancer case, but the data linking the hygiene product to disease risk are inconclusive.

16 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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