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image: A Walk on the Wild Side

A Walk on the Wild Side

By | February 1, 2017

Plants have so much to teach us.

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image: RNA Pathway Helps Keep Flies Alive

RNA Pathway Helps Keep Flies Alive

By | December 22, 2016

An anti-transposon pathway previously thought to function only in reproductive tissue also helps reduce harmful mutations in body cells of fruit flies.

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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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image: Tethering Transposons

Tethering Transposons

By | October 15, 2015

Panoramix, a newly identified transcription repressor, takes the bounce out of jumping genes.

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image: Wrangling Retrotransposons

Wrangling Retrotransposons

By , , and | March 1, 2015

These mobile genetic elements can wreak havoc on the genome. Researchers are now trying to understand how such activity contributes to the aging process.

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image: How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

By | January 29, 2015

A mass migration of mobile regulatory elements increased the expression of thousands of genes in the uterus during the evolution of pregnancy.

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image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

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image: A Long Line of LINEs

A Long Line of LINEs

By | September 1, 2014

Different mechanisms repress mobile DNA elements in human embryonic stem cells depending on the elements’ evolutionary ages.

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