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image: Aneuploid Responses

Aneuploid Responses

By | May 1, 2016

A recent exchange of papers is divided over the evidence for compensatory gene expression among wild strains of aneuploid yeast.

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image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

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image: Meiotic Mysteries

Meiotic Mysteries

By | May 1, 2016

Understanding why so many human oocytes contain the wrong number of chromosomes

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image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

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image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

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image: First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy

First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy

By | April 25, 2016

A biotech company reports that an experimental treatment elongated its CEO’s telomeres. 

8 Comments

image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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image: Microbes Meet Cancer

Microbes Meet Cancer

By | April 1, 2016

Understanding cancer’s relationship with the human microbiome could transform immune-modulating therapies.

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image: Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

Startup Licenses “Vaginal Seeding” Approach

By | March 31, 2016

Boston-based Commense plans to develop microbial and nonmicrobial interventions aimed at improving child health.

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