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image: Meiotic Mysteries

Meiotic Mysteries

By | May 1, 2016

Understanding why so many human oocytes contain the wrong number of chromosomes

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image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

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image: First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy

First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy

By | April 25, 2016

A biotech company reports that an experimental treatment elongated its CEO’s telomeres. 

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: X Marks the Sex-Skewed Spot

X Marks the Sex-Skewed Spot

By | March 7, 2016

Alterations in epigenetic markers on the X chromosome may be why males outnumber females among murine offspring bred through in vitro fertilization.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Surrogate Genes Enable Reproduction

Surrogate Genes Enable Reproduction

By | January 28, 2016

Increasing the expression of two genes from non-Y chromosomes restores spermatogenesis in male mice that lack Y chromosomes.

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image: How Multicellularity Arose

How Multicellularity Arose

By | January 11, 2016

Researchers identify a molecule that may have been key to the surprisingly common transition from single-celled ancestors to today’s complex, multicellular organisms. 

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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