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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Aneuploid Responses

Aneuploid Responses

By | May 1, 2016

A recent exchange of papers is divided over the evidence for compensatory gene expression among wild strains of aneuploid yeast.

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image: Meiotic Mysteries

Meiotic Mysteries

By | May 1, 2016

Understanding why so many human oocytes contain the wrong number of chromosomes

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image: A Scrambled Mess

A Scrambled Mess

By | May 1, 2016

Why do so many human eggs have the wrong number of chromosomes?

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image: First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy

First Data from Anti-Aging Gene Therapy

By | April 25, 2016

A biotech company reports that an experimental treatment elongated its CEO’s telomeres. 

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: X Marks the Sex-Skewed Spot

X Marks the Sex-Skewed Spot

By | March 7, 2016

Alterations in epigenetic markers on the X chromosome may be why males outnumber females among murine offspring bred through in vitro fertilization.

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