The Scientist

» field work

Most Recent

image: Orca Death Spurs Reevaluation of Satellite Tagging

Orca Death Spurs Reevaluation of Satellite Tagging

By | October 10, 2016

A cetacean succumbed to a fungal infection shortly after being darted by researchers seeking to learn more about the species’ migrations and population dynamics.

0 Comments

image: Fieldwork Bloopers

Fieldwork Bloopers

By | June 21, 2016

Scenes from illustrator Jim Jourdane’s Fieldwork Fail: The Messy Side of Science

0 Comments

image: Illustrating #FieldworkFails

Illustrating #FieldworkFails

By | June 21, 2016

An artist aims to publish a collection of stories of science gone awry.

1 Comment

image: Ready, Willing, and Able

Ready, Willing, and Able

By | October 1, 2015

Researchers with disabilities are making their fields more accessible.

0 Comments

image: Field Bloopers

Field Bloopers

By | August 3, 2015

Scientists air their most embarrassing fieldwork flubs on Twitter.

0 Comments

image: TS Live: Disease on the Wing

TS Live: Disease on the Wing

By | December 1, 2014

Bats' special relationship with pathogens

0 Comments

image: Sequencing at Sea

Sequencing at Sea

By | August 1, 2014

Watch University of Florida biologist Leonid Moroz describe his novel approach aboard his floating genome sequencing lab.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2013

Tracks and Shadows, The Gap, The Cure in the Code, and An Appetite for Wonder

0 Comments

image: Loss of Bees Bad for Plants

Loss of Bees Bad for Plants

By | July 23, 2013

Removing just a single bee species from an ecosystem can decrease the ability of the remaining species to pollinate plants.

1 Comment

image: US Research Fleet Bottoming Out

US Research Fleet Bottoming Out

By | June 12, 2013

Without major investment, the federal oceanographic fleet will shrink to a third of its current size over the next 20 years.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham