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image: Art Through the Nose

Art Through the Nose

By | November 29, 2012

A new show at New York’s Museum of Art and Design celebrates olfaction and the science behind modern perfume making.

3 Comments

image: Chimp Patents Challenged

Chimp Patents Challenged

By | November 16, 2012

Three patents on transgenic apes in the European Union will be challenged by animal rights activists.

1 Comment

image: A Root Cause of Parkinson’s

A Root Cause of Parkinson’s

By | November 15, 2012

Misfolded α-synuclein proteins promote the spread of Parkinson’s pathology in mouse brains.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Talking Genomics

Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

1 Comment

image: Inflammation for Regeneration

Inflammation for Regeneration

By | November 8, 2012

Inflammatory signals in injured zebrafish brains promote the growth of new neurons.

1 Comment

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Sandy’s Impact on Science

By | November 5, 2012

More stories surface about how last week’s super storm is affecting research up and down the coast—and how science is fighting back.

0 Comments

image: Gingers More Prone to Skin Cancer

Gingers More Prone to Skin Cancer

By | November 2, 2012

Researchers identify an unexpected molecular explanation for the higher incidence of skin cancer in redheads.

5 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

1 Comment

image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.

11 Comments

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