The Scientist

» Lost Colony and developmental biology

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape


image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.


image: Roanoke Revisited

Roanoke Revisited

By | January 1, 2012

In July 1587, a British colonist named John White accompanied 117 people to settle a small island sheltered within the barrier islands of what would become North Carolina’s Outer Banks. 


image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34


image: Lost Colony DNA

Lost Colony DNA

By | January 1, 2012

Genotyping could answer a centuries-old mystery about a vanished group of British settlers.


image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.


image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.


image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42


image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 


image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.


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