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image: <em>Legionella</em> Strikes Again

Legionella Strikes Again

By | September 2, 2015

Following an outbreak in New York City last month, Legionnaires’ disease pops up in Illinois and California. 

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image: Body, Heal Thyself

Body, Heal Thyself

By | September 1, 2015

Reviving a decades-old hypothesis of autoimmunity

8 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2015

Brain Storms, Orphan, Maize for the Gods, and Paranoid.

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image: Hear and Now

Hear and Now

By | September 1, 2015

Auditory research advances worth shouting about

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image: Huh?

Huh?

By | September 1, 2015

Hearing loss can occur for a variety of reasons, and sometimes more than one.

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image: Hurdles for Hearing Restoration

Hurdles for Hearing Restoration

By | September 1, 2015

Given the diverse cell types and complex structure of the human inner ear, will researchers ever be able to re-create it?

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image: Orchestrating Organoids

Orchestrating Organoids

By | September 1, 2015

A guide to crafting tissues in a dish that reprise in vivo organs

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image: The Upside

The Upside

By | September 1, 2015

Researchers explore the benefits of hearing loss and impairment.

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image: Next Generation: Cell-Covered Fastener

Next Generation: Cell-Covered Fastener

By | August 28, 2015

Scientists have developed an interlocking cell scaffold for easy building and dismantling of tissues.

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image: Hope for Universal Flu Vax?

Hope for Universal Flu Vax?

By | August 26, 2015

Two studies point to the possibility that a single vaccine could protect against every strain of flu virus.

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