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A species concept based on interacting nuclear and mitochondrial genes in bird species holds promise to more objectively define species.

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image: Five More Synthetic Yeast Chromosomes Completed

Five More Synthetic Yeast Chromosomes Completed

By | March 9, 2017

Members of the Synthetic Yeast Genome Project have synthesized five additional yeast chromosomes from scratch. 

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image: Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

Cortical Interneurons Show Layer-Specific Activities

By | March 2, 2017

Researchers examine the firing patterns of interneurons throughout all layers of the somatosensory cortices of alert mice.  

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image: Study: Most Long Noncoding RNAs Likely Functional

Study: Most Long Noncoding RNAs Likely Functional

By | March 2, 2017

Nearly 20,000 lncRNAs identified in human cells may play some role in cellular activities.

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image: A Selection of CRISPR Proof-of-Principle Studies

A Selection of CRISPR Proof-of-Principle Studies

By | March 1, 2017

Advice on how to deploy the latest techniques in your own lab

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 Zebra finches reared by another species learn to sing their foster parents’ song with rhythms characteristic of their genetic background.

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image: John Iversen Explores our Perception of Musical Rhythm

John Iversen Explores our Perception of Musical Rhythm

By | March 1, 2017

At the Swartz Center for Computational Neuroscience at the University of California, San Diego, the researcher studies the neurobiology of music perception.

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image: Massively Parallel Perturbations

Massively Parallel Perturbations

By | March 1, 2017

Scientists combine CRISPR gene editing with single-cell sequencing for genotype-phenotype screens.

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Zebra finches dial down dopamine signaling when they hear errors in a song performance.

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image: Singing In the Brain

Singing In the Brain

By | March 1, 2017

His first love was dance, but Erich Jarvis has long courted another love—understanding how the brain learns vocalization.

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