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» Croaton, developmental biology and evolution

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image: Ever Evolving <em>E. coli</em>

Ever Evolving E. coli

By | November 17, 2013

Scientists show that bacteria continue to become more fit, even over tens of thousands of generations.


image: Week in Review: November 11–15

Week in Review: November 11–15

By | November 15, 2013

Combating bacterial persistence; ancient canine evolution; T cells and transplants; sharing omics data and code


image: Origin of Domestic Dogs

Origin of Domestic Dogs

By | November 14, 2013

New analysis suggests that domestic dogs evolved from European wolves that interacted with human hunter-gatherers.


image: Felid Fossils

Felid Fossils

By | November 13, 2013

Paleontologists discover the oldest evidence yet suggesting that big cats originated in Asia.


image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | November 1, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2013

Tracks and Shadows, The Gap, The Cure in the Code, and An Appetite for Wonder


image: Dating the Origin of Us

Dating the Origin of Us

By | November 1, 2013

Theoretical anthropogeny seeks to understand how Homo sapiens rose to a position of global dominance.


image: How, If, and Why Species Form

How, If, and Why Species Form

By , and | November 1, 2013

Biologists have struggled for centuries to properly define what constitutes a “species.” They may have been asking the wrong question—many smaller organisms might not form species at all.


image: The Ultimate Wingman

The Ultimate Wingman

By | November 1, 2013

Differential gene expression between dominant and subordinate male turkeys could help evolutionary biologists deconstruct the roots of sexual dimorphism.

1 Comment

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39


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