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The Scientist

» Croaton, ecology and neuroscience

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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image: Closing the Loop

Closing the Loop

By | October 1, 2015

Micromanaging neuronal behavior with optogenetics

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image: Sugar Coma Model

Sugar Coma Model

By | October 1, 2015

How glucose fires up sleep-inducing neurons

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Brain Electric</em>

Book Excerpt from The Brain Electric

By | October 1, 2015

Author Malcolm Gay explores the science underlying headline-making research into neural prosthetics.

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image: Brain Freeze

Brain Freeze

By | October 1, 2015

A common tissue fixation method distorts the true neuronal landscape.

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image: Brain New World

Brain New World

By | October 1, 2015

The melding of mind and machine uncovers mysteries harbored in the brain.

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image: Circuit Dynamo

Circuit Dynamo

By | October 1, 2015

Eve Marder’s quest to understand neurotransmitter signaling is more than 40 years old and still going strong.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Holding Neurons Steady

Holding Neurons Steady

By | October 1, 2015

Scientists engineer a feedback loop to fine-tune neuron activity with optogenetics.

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image: Into the Limelight

Into the Limelight

By | October 1, 2015

Glial cells were once considered neurons’ supporting actors, but new methods and model organisms are revealing their true importance in brain function.

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