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» Croaton, evolution and developmental biology

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Adding Padding

By | November 1, 2015

Adipogenesis in mice has alternating genetic requirements throughout the animals’ lives.

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image: Evolution of the Penis

Evolution of the Penis

By | October 30, 2015

A phallus-less reptile goes through a developmental stage with external genitalia, suggesting a common origin for the organ among amniotes.

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image: Dogs Originated in Central Asia

Dogs Originated in Central Asia

By | October 21, 2015

Man’s best friend was domesticated near Nepal and Mongolia at least 15,000 years ago, according to a genetic analysis.

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image: Life Before 4 Billion Years Ago?

Life Before 4 Billion Years Ago?

By | October 20, 2015

A new estimate of the origin of life on Earth pushes back the date by 300 million years.

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image: Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

Stem Cell Therapy In Utero

By | October 13, 2015

An upcoming clinical trial aims to correct for a disease of fragile bones in affected babies before they are born.

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image: Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk

By | October 1, 2015

Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.

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image: Sex on the Brain

Sex on the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Masculinization of the developing rodent brain leads to significant structural differences between the two sexes.

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image: Sex Differences in the Brain

Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

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image: Polar Dino Discovered

Polar Dino Discovered

By | September 28, 2015

Researchers working in Alaska, above the Arctic Circle, have unearthed the northernmost species of dinosaur ever found.

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image: Tree of Life v1.0

Tree of Life v1.0

By | September 22, 2015

Researchers map 2.3 million species in a single phylogeny. 

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