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image: Brains Before Brawn

Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Clock Reset on Denisovan-Neanderthal Split

Clock Reset on Denisovan-Neanderthal Split

By | March 14, 2016

Nuclear DNA from 430,000-year-old specimens indicates that Neanderthals had already diverged from their ancient-human predecessors.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

CRISPRi-Controlled Gene Expression

By | March 10, 2016

A variation of the gene-editing technique can more precisely and efficiently downregulate the expression of target genes than traditional CRISPR/Cas9.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Dragonfly is World-Record Flier

Dragonfly is World-Record Flier

By | March 3, 2016

Researchers have determined that a diminutive insect out-flies all other winged migrators by traveling thousands of miles between continents and across oceans yearly.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Dial It Up, Dial It Down

Dial It Up, Dial It Down

By | March 1, 2016

Newer CRISPR tools for manipulating transcription will help unlock noncoding RNA’s many roles.

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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