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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

11 Comments

image: Self-Improvement Through the Ages

Self-Improvement Through the Ages

By | February 1, 2014

A 50,000-generation-long experiment shows that bacteria keep getting fitter.

2 Comments

image: New River Dolphin

New River Dolphin

By | January 27, 2014

DNA sequencing study reveals a new river dolphin species in South America.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

6 Comments

image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.

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image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.

3 Comments

image: The Shared Perfumes of Queens

The Shared Perfumes of Queens

By | January 16, 2014

Ant, bee, and wasp queens emit a similar class of pheromones that sterilize their workers, hinting at a shared ancestry for these chemicals.

1 Comment

image: Clocks Versus Rocks

Clocks Versus Rocks

By | January 14, 2014

A new analysis suggests that placental mammals originated while dinosaurs were dominant, contradicting a recent high-profile study.

3 Comments

image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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