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image: Week in Review: September 5–9

Week in Review: September 5–9

By | September 9, 2016

Environmental magnetite in the human brain; prion structure takes shape; watching E. coli evolve in real time; learning from others’ behavior 

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image: First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape

First Glimpse at Infectious Prion Shape

By | September 8, 2016

The preliminary structure of the misfolded protein that causes mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease looks like a coiled mattress spring.

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image: Odor, Taste, and Light Receptors in Unusual Locations

Odor, Taste, and Light Receptors in Unusual Locations

By | September 1, 2016

From the gut and airways to the blood, muscle, and skin, diverse sensory receptors are doing unconventional things.

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image: Proprioception: The Sense Within

Proprioception: The Sense Within

By and | September 1, 2016

Knowing where our bodies are in space is critical for the control of our movements and for our sense of self.

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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image: One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

One Antigen Receptor Induces Two T cell Types

By | August 26, 2016

Precursor T cells bearing the same antigen receptor adopt two different fates in mice.

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image: Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

Wanted: Transcriptional Regulators

By | August 1, 2016

Researchers have designed a screen to find unique molecules, called riboswitches, that determine whether transcription will proceed.

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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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