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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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image: Prions Important for Memories

Prions Important for Memories

By | February 19, 2014

The formation of long-term memories employs the chain-forming habits of prions.  

1 Comment

image: Stranger than Fiction

Stranger than Fiction

By | January 1, 2014

Plant biology: You can't make this stuff up.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Bright Side of Prions

The Bright Side of Prions

By | January 1, 2014

Associated with numerous neurological diseases, misfolded proteins may also play decisive roles in normal cellular functioning.  

6 Comments

image: Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

Prion-like Proteins Cause Disease

By | March 3, 2013

Normal proteins with regions resembling disease-causing prions are responsible for an inherited disorder that affects the brain, muscle, and bone.

2 Comments

image: Prions Involved in Learning

Prions Involved in Learning

By | February 15, 2013

Properly folded prions aid in normal brain development.

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image: Corrupted Proteins Spread Disease

Corrupted Proteins Spread Disease

By | June 18, 2012

A protein fragment involved in Alzheimer’s can seed new clusters throughout the brain, pointing to prion-like qualities of the disease.

10 Comments

image: Mad Cow in California

Mad Cow in California

By | April 30, 2012

A variant of the prion disease that causes bovine spongiform encephalopathy was found in the United States.

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