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image: The Birds and the Bees

The Birds and the Bees

By | March 1, 2011

A recent book exposes what Darwin got wrong about sexual behavior in birds, and what his error tells us about the evolution of scientific knowledge.

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Losers Fight Back

By | February 1, 2011

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Book excerpt from <em>Everyday Practice of Science</em>

Book excerpt from Everyday Practice of Science

By | February 1, 2011

In Chapter 3, “Credibility: Validating Discovery Claims,” author Frederick Grinnell details the difficulty in making discoveries that buck current scientific paradigms.

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2011

February 2011's selection of notable quotes

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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2011

Quirk, Darwin's Armada, The Death & Life of Monterey Bay, Elegance in Science

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image: The Evolution of Credibility

The Evolution of Credibility

By | February 1, 2011

The winding path that an interesting result takes to become a bona fide discovery is just one of the topics covered in this new book on the practice of science.

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image: Appealing Choice

Appealing Choice

By | January 1, 2011

A book is born from pondering why sexual selection was, for so long, a minor component of evolutionary biology.

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image: Eau de Choice

Eau de Choice

By | January 1, 2011

Evolutionary biologist Jane Hurst at the University of Liverpool has found that male mice have evolved a cunning trick to distinguish themselves within the dating pool: they produce a specific protein that drives female attraction to male scent, and this molecule, called darcin, helps females remember a specific male's odor.

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Mail

By | January 1, 2011

A selection of comments from our readers

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image: Watt Fun!

Watt Fun!

By | January 1, 2011

Her doctoral advisor told her to amuse herself, and Fiona Watt has done just that—probing individual stem cells and determining the genes and molecules that direct them to differentiate or cause them to contribute to cancer.

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