The Scientist

» top 10 innovations

Most Recent

image: Doors and Pores

Doors and Pores

By | December 1, 2016

The awesome architecture of the gateways to the nucleus

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 30–December 4

Week in Review: November 30–December 4

By | December 4, 2015

Historic meeting on human gene editing; signs of obesity found in sperm epigenome; top 10 innovations of 2015; dealing with retractions

0 Comments

image: 2015 Top 10 Innovations

2015 Top 10 Innovations

By | April 13, 2015

Submit a product by filling out the questions below.

3 Comments

image: 2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

By | April 13, 2015

Submissions are officially open for this year’s Top 10 Innovations contest.

0 Comments

image: Top 10 Innovations 2012

Top 10 Innovations 2012

By | December 1, 2012

The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.

5 Comments

image: Submit Your Innovations Today!

Submit Your Innovations Today!

By | August 29, 2012

You have until the end of this week (Sept. 21 @ 11:59 PM, EDT) to submit your product to The Scientist's 2012 Top 10 Innovations. Be sure to enter your innovative products!

0 Comments

image: Top Ten Innovations 2011

Top Ten Innovations 2011

By | January 1, 2012

Our list of the best and brightest products that 2011 had to offer the life scientist

5 Comments

image: 2011's Best and Brightest

2011's Best and Brightest

By | January 1, 2012

In its brief, 4-year history, The Scientist’s annual Top 10 Innovations contest has become a showcase of the coolest life science tools to emerge in the previous year. 

15 Comments

Popular Now

  1. UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe
    Daily News UC Berkeley Receives CRISPR Patent in Europe

    The European Patent Office will grant patent rights over the use of CRISPR in all cell types to a University of California team, contrasting with a recent decision in the U.S.

  2. DNA Replication Errors Contribute to Cancer Risk
  3. Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?
    Daily News Should Healthy People Have Their Exomes Sequenced?

    With its announced launch of a whole-exome sequencing service for apparently healthy individuals, Ambry Genetics is the latest company to enter this growing market. But whether these services are useful for most people remains up for debate.  

  4. Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target
    Daily News Rethinking a Cancer Drug Target

    The results of a CRISPR-Cas9 study suggest that MELK—a protein thought to play a critical role in cancer—is not necessary for cancer cell survival.

Business Birmingham