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image: H6N1 Can Affect Humans

H6N1 Can Affect Humans

By | November 14, 2013

Taiwanese scientists confirm the first person to have been infected by the H6N1 strain of avian flu.

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image: T cells and Transplantation

T cells and Transplantation

By | November 13, 2013

Drug-resistant immune cells protect patients from graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplant.

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image: Time for T cells

Time for T cells

By | November 7, 2013

Circadian rhythms control the development of inflammatory T cells, while jet lag sends their production into overdrive.

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image: Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

Newborn Immune Systems Suppressed

By | November 6, 2013

Cells that temporarily restrain their immune systems give babies’ gut bacteria a chance to settle down. 

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image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

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image: It’s in the Genes

It’s in the Genes

By | October 24, 2013

Researchers find strong correlations between the composition of the human microbiome and genetic variation in immune-related pathways.

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image: Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

Drug Widens Immunity to Flu

By | October 20, 2013

An immune suppressive drug can unexpectedly help immunized mice fight off many strains of flu.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2013

September 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Multiple Bird Flu Threats Lurk

Multiple Bird Flu Threats Lurk

By | August 23, 2013

The avian influenza virus H7N7, a cousin to H7N9, has been found in Chinese live poultry markets.

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image: Safe Flu Research Strategy

Safe Flu Research Strategy

By | August 12, 2013

Researchers develop a new “molecular biocontainment” strategy for safely studying deadly flu viruses.

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