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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2015

The Genealogy of a Gene, On the Move, The Chimp and the River, and Domesticated

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Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2015

May 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Think Before You Fire

Think Before You Fire

By | May 1, 2015

Industry layoffs may save a few dollars, at the cost of losing the collective brainpower of thousands of scientists.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | April 16, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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image: The 2015 Salary Survey Is Complete

The 2015 Salary Survey Is Complete

By | March 13, 2015

Thanks to everyone who participated in this year's survey. Please check back in November for the results.

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image: Bird Flu Spreads in China and the U.S.

Bird Flu Spreads in China and the U.S.

By | March 12, 2015

China reports new H7N9 bird flu infections in humans while other strains are detected in US commercial turkey farms.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Galileo’s Middle Finger</em>

Book Excerpt from Galileo’s Middle Finger

By | March 10, 2015

In Chapter 4, “A Show-Me State of Mind,” author Alice Dreger describes the start of her journey studying scientists who had conducted controversial research.

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