The Scientist

» bird flu and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: H5N1 Vaccine Approved

H5N1 Vaccine Approved

By | November 25, 2013

The US Food and Drug Administration OKs a vaccine against the virus that last year had the scientific community debating the regulation of deadly pathogen research.

0 Comments

image: H6N1 Can Affect Humans

H6N1 Can Affect Humans

By | November 14, 2013

Taiwanese scientists confirm the first person to have been infected by the H6N1 strain of avian flu.

0 Comments

image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

0 Comments

image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2013

September 2013's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Multiple Bird Flu Threats Lurk

Multiple Bird Flu Threats Lurk

By | August 23, 2013

The avian influenza virus H7N7, a cousin to H7N9, has been found in Chinese live poultry markets.

0 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Safe Flu Research Strategy

Safe Flu Research Strategy

By | August 12, 2013

Researchers develop a new “molecular biocontainment” strategy for safely studying deadly flu viruses.

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: August 5–9

Week in Review: August 5–9

By | August 9, 2013

Flu researchers propose H7N9 studies; NIH makes deal to share HeLa genome; herbal “remedies” can cause cancer; scientists record grid cell activity in humans

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS