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image: Judge Decides on GM Rice Retraction

Judge Decides on GM Rice Retraction

By | August 3, 2015

Ethical breaches in a study on the benefits of so-called “golden rice” lead to the paper being pulled from the literature.

11 Comments

image: Building Bigger Beefsteaks

Building Bigger Beefsteaks

By | August 1, 2015

Understanding the genetics of stem cell population maintenance in plants producing jumbo tomatoes could help scientists generate more-massive fruits.

0 Comments

image: Silence of the Lambs

Silence of the Lambs

By | August 1, 2015

A die-off of newborn lambs in Australia leads to the discovery of a new toxin and clues to a devastating liver disease in children.

2 Comments

image: TB Traces

TB Traces

By | August 1, 2015

Take a trip to the mummy museum in Vác, Hungary, to see the human remains that helped researchers learn more about the origins of tuberculosis in Europe.

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image: Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

By | July 29, 2015

A US Army lab shipped live spores of the deadly bacterium because of improper irradiation protocols, a Department of Defense review has found.

1 Comment

image: Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

By | July 22, 2015

In some pathogenic bacteria, certain antibiotic resistance–associated mutations may also confer an unexpected growth advantage.

0 Comments

image: Underground Immunity

Underground Immunity

By | July 16, 2015

Arabidopsis thaliana defense hormones shape the plant’s root microbiome. 

0 Comments

image: Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>

Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff

By | July 14, 2015

Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.

1 Comment

image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

3 Comments

image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

0 Comments

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